Join us for a lecture on medical sociology from 2013 Reeder Award winner Dr. Charles Bosk

bbag-iconMedical Sociology as Vocation

Event flyer: Bosk Flyer

This presentation discusses what it means to speak of ‘medical sociology as a vocation.’ The presentation uses Weber’s classic essay ‘Science as a Vocation’ as its departure point. It describes how medical sociology can play a role in understanding the institution of medicine at multiple levels–from the formulation of national policy to the behavior of front-line workers. It discusses how to best balance objectivity and advocacy.

Nov-13-for-blogJoin us for Dr. Bosk’s lecture on Wednesday, November 13, 2013 from noon till 1 pm in person or online:

In person: The lecture will take place in C102 East Fee Hall on MSU’s East Lansing campus. Feel free to bring your lunch! Beverages and light snacks will be provided.

Online: Here are some instructions for your first time joining the webinar, or if you have attended or viewed them before, go to the meeting!

Charles Bosk, Ph.D. holds a secondary chair in the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, with appointments in the History and Sociology of Science department, the Annenberg School for Communication and the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics.  He is the author of numerous books including Forgive and Remember (University of Chicago Press, 2nd edition 2003), All God’s Mistakes: Genetic Counseling in a Pediatric Hospital (University Of Chicago Press, 1992), and most recently, What Would You Do? Juggling Bioethics and Ethnography (University of Chicago Press, 2008). He has become an authoritative voice in academic and policy debates about professionalism and patient safety. The American Sociological Association recognized his many achievements with the 2013 Leo G. Reeder Award.

About Michigan State Bioethics

Devoted to understanding and teaching the ethical, social and humanistic dimensions of illness and health care since 1977.
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