February webinar to address Michigan’s vaccine waiver education policy

bbag-blog-image-logoWhat’s the point of Michigan’s vaccine waiver education requirement?

Event Flyer

Since 2015, Michigan parents have had to attend education sessions at public health offices if they want their unvaccinated or under-vaccinated children to attend school or daycare. This policy seems to have succeeded: the state’s nonmedical exemption rate declined by 35% from 2014 to 2015. But what explains this apparent success? Are parents changing their minds as a result of mandatory vaccine education, or are they choosing to vaccinate rather than be inconvenienced by education sessions? Also, does vaccine education promote additional public health goals, i.e. other than short-term vaccination compliance? This presentation will attempt to answer these questions by drawing on immunization records, interviews with public health staff, and surveys of health department leaders, with the goal of informing arguments about the value of Michigan’s vaccine waiver education policy.

Feb 15 date iconJoin us for Dr. Navin’s lecture on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 from noon till 1 pm in person or online.

Mark Navin, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Oakland University. His recent work is primarily in bioethics and public health ethics. His book, Values and Vaccine Refusal, was published by Routledge in 2015.

In person: This lecture will take place in C102 East Fee Hall on MSU’s East Lansing campus. Feel free to bring your lunch! Beverages and light snacks will be provided.

Online: Here are some instructions for your first time joining the webinar, or if you have attended or viewed them before, go to the meeting!

Can’t make it? All webinars are recorded! Visit our archive of recorded lecturesTo receive reminders before each webinar, please subscribe to our mailing list.

Prospects, Promises and Perils of Human Mind-Reading

bbag-blog-image-logoProspects, Promises and Perils of Human Mind-Reading

Event Flyer

In recent years, several research groups have been able to infer the contents of subjects’ thoughts from fMRI scans. E-commerce sites are tracking customers’ purchases and making ever better predictions about what people will buy. What are the prospects for such technology to be widely used? Are there fundamental technical limitations?

We may readily imagine dystopian scenarios for such technology, where privacy as we have known it is no longer meaningful, and the powerful monitor the thoughts of everyone else. We may also imagine that therapists could better communicate with autistic or troubled people, or to detect incipient mental illness.

nov-29-bbagJoin us for Dr. Reimer’s lecture on Wednesday, November 29, 2017 from noon till 1 pm in person or online.

Mark Reimers, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the Neuroscience Program in the College of Natural Science at Michigan State University. Dr. Reimers’ research focuses on analyzing and interpreting the very large data sets now being generated in neuroscience, especially from the high-throughput technologies developed by the BRAIN initiative. He obtained his MSc in scientific computing, and his PhD in probability theory from the University of British Columbia in Canada. He has worked at Memorial University in Canada, the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, at several start-up companies in Toronto and in Boston, at the National Institutes of Health in Maryland, the Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics in Richmond, and since January 2015 in the Neuroscience Program at Michigan State University.

In person: This lecture will take place in C102 East Fee Hall on MSU’s East Lansing campus. Feel free to bring your lunch! Beverages and light snacks will be provided.

Online: Here are some instructions for your first time joining the webinar, or if you have attended or viewed them before, go to the meeting!

Can’t make it? All webinars are recorded! Visit our archive of recorded lecturesTo receive reminders before each webinar, please subscribe to our mailing list.

What level of risk will be tolerated for interventions that are developed for treating “pre-diseased” patients?

bbag-blog-image-logoCrossing the Biology to Pathobiology Threshold: Distinguishing Precision Health from Precision Medicine

Event Flyer

Diseases have long been defined by their symptoms, and therefore patients have typically been treated when they are symptomatic. However, through advances in “omics,” wearable sensors, insertable microscopes, liquid biopsies, point-of-care pathology, and other innovations, it is possible to make a molecular diagnosis prior to apparent symptoms. These tools will enable a transition from Precision Medicine where the molecular etiology is determined after symptoms appear, to Precision Health in which the molecular etiology of diseases can be anticipated and symptoms averted. However, is it ethical to treat “asymptomatic disease” and at what cost to the healthcare system? What level of risk will be tolerated for interventions that are developed for treating “pre-diseased” patients? Since many of these assays will predict likelihood of disease and not absolute progression to disease, what level of certainty is needed to intervene at all? Medicine is being redefined and we are behind in understanding what is meant by the simple terms health and disease.

October 11 calendar iconJoin us for Dr. Contag’s lecture on Wednesday, October 11, 2017 from noon till 1 pm in person or online.

Dr. Christopher H. Contag is the chair of the inaugural Department of Biomedical Engineering and founding Director of the Institute for Quantitative Health Science and Engineering at Michigan State University. Dr. Contag is also Professor emeritus in the Department of Pediatrics at Stanford University. Dr. Contag received his B.S. in Biology from the University of Minnesota, St. Paul in 1982. He received his Ph.D. in Microbiology from the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis in 1988. He did his postdoctoral training at Stanford University from 1990-1994, and then joined Stanford faculty in 1995 where he was professor in the Departments of Pediatrics, Radiology, Bioengineering and Microbiology & Immunology until 2016. Dr. Contag is a pioneer in the field of molecular imaging and is developing imaging approaches aimed at revealing molecular processes in living subjects, including humans, and advancing therapeutic strategies through imaging. He is a founding member and past president of the Society for Molecular Imaging (SMI), and recipient of the Achievement Award from the SMI and the Britton Chance Award from SPIE for his fundamental contributions to optics. Dr. Contag is a Fellow of the World Molecular Imaging Society (WMIS) and the recent past President of WMIS. Dr. Contag was a founder of Xenogen Corp. (now part of PerkinElmer) established to commercialize innovative imaging tools for biomedicine. He is also a founder of BioEclipse—a cancer therapy company, and PixelGear—a point-of-care pathology company.

In person: This lecture will take place in C102 East Fee Hall on MSU’s East Lansing campus. Feel free to bring your lunch! Beverages and light snacks will be provided.

Online: Here are some instructions for your first time joining the webinar, or if you have attended or viewed them before, go to the meeting!

Can’t make it? All webinars are recorded! Visit our archive of recorded lecturesTo receive reminders before each webinar, please subscribe to our mailing list.

Covert Costs of Racial and Ethnic Concordance in the Medical Workforce

bbag-icon-decCovert Costs of Racial and Ethnic Concordance in the Medical Workforce

Event Flyer

Over the past century US medical workforce demographics have shifted. Moving away from a white male dominated profession, there is a welcomed push towards increasing gender, ethnic, racial and linguistic representation. Commonly, that push is linked to notions of desirable doctor/patient identity matching – described here as “concordance.” That demographic shift is accompanied by policy initiatives and rhetoric shaping the professional futures of Native American, African American, and Latino underrepresented minority (URM) physicians. Do these policy initiatives carry social costs that inadvertently influence URM’s futures in the medical workforce? This analysis considers the nature of medical workforce policy strategies. Findings suggest that selectively placing service expectations not similarly placed on their non-minority physician colleagues along with unexamined assumptions of racial/ethnic concordance between patient and physician may place an undue burden on URMs.

jan18-bbagJoin us for Ms. Bogdan-Lovis and Dr. Kelly-Blake’s lecture on Wednesday, January 18, 2017 from noon till 1 pm in person or online.

Dr. Kelly-Blake is an Assistant Professor in the Center for Ethics and the Department of Medicine. Ms. Bogdan-Lovis is the Assistant Director for the Center for Ethics. Bogdan-Lovis and Kelly-Blake are co-leading a multi-institutional research project on Doctor-patient Race/Ethnic Concordance in the Medical Workforce. They are interested in unpacking the complexities surrounding underrepresented minority service to the underserved and how that service may distract those physicians from pursuing other medical professional opportunities.

In person: This lecture will take place in C102 East Fee Hall on MSU’s East Lansing campus. Feel free to bring your lunch! Beverages and light snacks will be provided.

Online: Here are some instructions for your first time joining the webinar, or if you have attended or viewed them before, go to the meeting!

Can’t make it? All webinars are recorded! Visit our archive of recorded lectures. To receive reminders before each webinar, please subscribe to our mailing list.

Announcing the Spring 2017 Bioethics Brownbag & Webinar Series

bbag-icon-decThis year’s Bioethics Brownbag & Webinar Series will resume on January 18, 2017 with a lecture from Center Assistant Professor Dr. Karen Kelly-Blake and Assistant Director Libby Bogdan-Lovis on “Covert Costs of Racial and Ethnic Concordance in the Medical Workforce.” Each lecture can be streamed live online, or attended in person in East Fee Hall on MSU’s East Lansing campus. Information about the spring series is listed below, and you can visit our website for more details, including the full description and speaker bio for each event.

Spring 2017 Series Flyer

jan18-bbagCovert Costs of Racial and Ethnic Concordance in the Medical Workforce

Do policy initiatives carry social costs that inadvertently influence underrepresented minority physicians’ futures in the medical workforce?
Wednesday, January 18, 2017
Karen Kelly-Blake, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences and the Department of Medicine; Libby Bogdan-Lovis, MA, is Assistant Director of the Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences in the College of Human Medicine at Michigan State University.

feb15-bbagRecurrent and Neglected Ethical Issues in the Psychiatric Brain Stimulation Discussion
What are key ethical concerns surrounding the use of psychiatric deep brain stimulation (DBS)?
Wednesday, February 15, 2017
Laura Y. Cabrera, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Neuroethics in the Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences and the Department of Translational Science & Molecular Medicine in the College of Human Medicine at Michigan State University.

mar22-bbagThe Choice to Become a Research Subject: A First-Person Perspective
Did I have a responsibility to contribute to a study that could help future patients in my situation?
Wednesday, March 22, 2017
Rebecca Dresser, JD, is a Professor of Law at Washington University in St. Louis.

apr19-bbagSocial Determinants of Behavioral Health
Wednesday, April 19, 2017
C. Debra Furr-Holden, PhD, is a C.S. Mott Endowed Professor of Public Health in the Division of Public Health, and a Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics in the College of Human Medicine at Michigan State University.

In person: These lectures will take place in C102 (Patenge Room) East Fee Hall on MSU’s East Lansing campus. Feel free to bring your lunch! Beverages and light snacks will be provided.

Online: Here are some instructions for your first time joining the webinar, or if you have attended or viewed them before, go to the meeting!

Can’t make it? Every lecture is recorded and posted for viewing in our archive. If you’d like to receive a reminder before each lecture, please subscribe to our mailing list.

Trust and the Learning Health System

bbag-icon-decEvent Flyer

Data sharing on a large scale is integral to emerging national initiatives such as learning health systems and precision medicine. Realizing the vision of learning health systems, “in which knowledge generation is so embedded into the core of the practice of medicine that it is a natural outgrowth and product of the healthcare delivery process and leads to continual improvement in care” requires a “trust fabric” to integrate policy and practice in health care, public health, and research. However, as increased data sharing stretches the currently disjointed regulatory and policy environment, the texture and resilience of this trust fabric will be challenged in its capacity to protect the public and its vulnerable populations, and to assure data will be used in ways that reflect societal values. What will it take to trust the health system with all that information? This presentation will examine these tensions and dynamics. Based on preliminary data from the clinic and the community, Dr. Platt will discuss a proposed a framework for trust to guide decision-making for local, state, and national learning health systems.

nov9-bbagJoin us for Dr. Jodyn Platt’s lecture on Wednesday, November 9, 2016 from noon until 1 pm in person or online.

Jodyn Platt, MPH, PhD, is an Assistant Professor trained in medical sociology and health policy. Her research currently focuses on informed consent in cancer and genomic studies, and the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) of public health genetics, newborn screening, and learning health systems. She is interested in understanding what makes learning health systems trusted and the pathways for achieving and sustaining trust through community engagement using qualitative and survey methods.

In person: This lecture will take place in C102 East Fee Hall on MSU’s East Lansing campus. Feel free to bring your lunch! Beverages and light snacks will be provided.

Online: Here are some instructions for your first time joining the webinar, or if you have attended or viewed them before, go to the meeting!

Can’t make it? All webinars are recorded! Visit our archive of recorded lectures. To receive reminders before each webinar, please subscribe to our mailing list.

Ethics and Children with Differences in Sex Development and Gender Nonconformity

green brownbag/webinar iconEvent Flyer

Society once considered children born with atypical genital anatomy to be freaks of nature. Until recently, doctors labeled these children “hermaphrodites” and urged early appearance-altering surgery. While times have changed, somewhat, medical interventions continue despite mounting evidence of long-term harms associated with both medical and surgical “treatment.” In the last few years, family, public, and medical attention has increasingly focused on children who feel trapped in the body of the “opposite” sex and wish to live as the other gender. Controversy continues about how often these feelings persist into adulthood and when to use medical interventions, such as hormone blocking to prevent full pubertal development, to support the gender nonconformity. When should society constrain clinicians from intervening in these contentious arenas?

sept 28 calendar iconJoin us for Joel E. Frader’s lecture on Wednesday, September 28, 2016 from noon till 1 pm in person or online.

Joel E. Frader, MD, MA, is the A Todd Davis Professor of General Academic Pediatrics and Professor of Bioethics and Medical Humanities at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. He is the Medical Director of the Pediatric Palliative Care Program at Lurie Children’s Hospital in Chicago. He received a B.A. from Columbia University (1970), a M.D. from Tufts (1974), and a M.A. in Sociology from the University of Pennsylvania (1980) where he was a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar. He is active in and served in leadership positions for national organizations concerned with pediatrics and bioethics. He teaches, consults and conducts research in bioethics and palliative care, focusing on ethical issues involving children in the health care system and innovation in health care. He has special interest in ethics in organ transplantation, children with differences in sexual development (intersex) and gender nonconformity, decision making at the end of life, and the ethics of human subjects research.

In person: This lecture will take place in C102 East Fee Hall on MSU’s East Lansing campus. Feel free to bring your lunch! Beverages and light snacks will be provided.

Online: Here are some instructions for your first time joining the webinar, or if you have attended or viewed them before, go to the meeting!

Can’t make it? All webinars are recorded! Visit our archive of recorded lectures. To receive reminders before each webinar, please subscribe to our mailing list.

Announcing the Fall 2016 Bioethics Brownbag & Webinar Series

bbag-iconThe Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences at Michigan State University is proud to announce the 2016-2017 Bioethics Brownbag & Webinar Series, featuring a wide variety of topics from under the bioethics umbrella. The fall series will begin on September 28, 2016, and you can attend the lecture in person or watch live online. Information about the fall series is listed below, and you can visit our website for more details, including the full description and speaker bio for each event.

Fall 2016 Series Flyer

sept28-bbagEthics and Children with Differences in Sex Development and Gender Nonconformity
When should society constrain clinicians from intervening in these contentious arenas?
Wednesday, September 28, 2016
Joel E. Frader, MD, MA, is a Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Bioethics and Medical Humanities at Northwestern University, and Medical Director of Bridges Pediatric Palliative Care Program at Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago.

oct19-bbagChoosing to Test: Dr. A. P. Satterthwaite and the First Birth Control Pill Clinical Trials in Humacao, Puerto Rico
How did Adaline Pendleton Satterthwaite, an obstetrician-gynecologist (OB-GYN) working at a Protestant mission hospital in Puerto Rico, become one of the key architects of the first birth control pill?
Wednesday, October 19, 2016
Kathryn Lankford is a Doctoral Student in the Department of History at Michigan State University.

nov9-bbagTrust and the Learning Health System
What will it take to trust the health system with all that information?
Wednesday, November 9, 2016
Jodyn Platt, MPH, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Learning and Knowledge Systems in the Department of Learning Health Sciences at the University of Michigan Medical School.

In person: These lectures will take place in C102 (Patenge Room) East Fee Hall on MSU’s East Lansing campus. Feel free to bring your lunch! Beverages and light snacks will be provided.

Online: Here are some instructions for your first time joining the webinar, or if you have attended or viewed them before, go to the meeting!

Can’t make it? Every lecture is recorded and posted for viewing in our archive. If you’d like to receive a reminder before each lecture, please subscribe to our mailing list.

Re-envisioning shared decision making in primary care

bbag-icon-decRe-envisioning shared decision making in primary care

Event Flyer

Shared decision making is increasingly advocated as the best approach to patient care for many if not most medical decisions. Yet, actually implementing shared decision making in the primary care setting has remained vexingly elusive. This talk will explore the following questions: Can shared decision making include a primary care provider’s recommendation? If so, how can care recommendations be tailored to be more patient-centered?

apr-13-bbag.jpgJoin us for Tanner Caverly’s lecture on Wednesday, April 13, 2016 from noon till 1 pm in person or online.

Tanner Caverly, MD, MPH, is a general internist and health services researcher at the University of Michigan and Ann Arbor VA Center for Clinical Management Research. In 2012 Dr. Caverly co-founded the Do No Harm Project – an award-winning program that uses clinical vignettes written by clinical trainees to improve recognition of the harms that can result from medical overuse. His research explores the general question: How can population evidence and clinical practice guidelines be better translated for and communicated to patients? In both his teaching and research, Dr. Caverly strives to promote the vision set out by Dr. Bernard Lown to do “as much as possible for the patient and as little as possible to the patient.”

In person: This lecture will take place in C102 East Fee Hall on MSU’s East Lansing campus. Feel free to bring your lunch! Beverages and light snacks will be provided.

Online: Here are some instructions for your first time joining the webinar, or if you have attended or viewed them before, go to the meeting!

Can’t make it? All webinars are recorded! View our archive of recorded lectures.

How Midwives Learn: Origins of the Home Birth Controversy

bbag-icon-decHow Midwives Learn: Origins of the Home Birth Controversy

Event Flyer

Recent media coverage of the increasing popularity of out-of-hospital births in the U.S. has generated a widespread debate about the politics and place of birth. This is not a new phenomenon. In the 1970s, a quiet revolution spread across cities and suburbs, towns and farms, as individuals challenged legal, institutional and medical protocols by choosing unlicensed midwives to catch their babies at home. But just who were these self-proclaimed midwives who seemed to appear overnight, and how did they learn their trade? Because the United States had virtually eliminated midwifery by the mid-twentieth century, most of these newer “rebels” had little knowledge of or exposure to the historic practice, and had to determine for themselves how to define, learn, and teach midwifery skills. This talk examines the creation, controversies, and evolution of the first accredited program for non-nurse midwives in the U.S., the Seattle Midwifery School.

sept-23-bbag

Join us for Wendy Kline’s lecture on Wednesday, September 23, 2015 from noon till 1 pm in person or online.

Wendy Kline, PhD, is the Dema G. Seelye Chair in the History of Medicine in the Department of History at Purdue University. She is the author of several articles and two books: Bodies of Knowledge: Sexuality, Reproduction, and Women’s Health in the Second Wave (University of Chicago Press, 2010) and Building a Better Race: Gender, Sexuality, and Eugenics from the Turn of the Century to the Baby Boom (University of California Press, 2001). Her current book project, under contract with Oxford University Press, is entitled Coming Home: Medicine, Midwives, and the Transformation of Birth in Late-Twentieth-Century America. Two related articles are forthcoming in 2015: “Communicating a New Consciousness: Countercultural Print and the Home Birth Movement in the 1970s,” Bulletin of the History of Medicine and “The Little Manual That Started a Revolution: How Hippie Midwifery Became Mainstream,” in David Kaiser and Patrick McCray, eds., Groovy Science: The Countercultural Embrace of Science and Technology over the Long 1970s. In 2014 Kline was selected as a distinguished lecturer for the Organization of American Historians. She is also a professional violinist, and is currently a member of the Lafayette Symphony Orchestra.

In person: This lecture will take place in C102 Patenge Room in East Fee Hall on MSU’s East Lansing campus. Feel free to bring your lunch! Beverages and light snacks will be provided.

Online: Here are some instructions for your first time joining the webinar, or if you have attended or viewed them before, go to the meeting! *

Can’t make it? All webinars are recorded! View our archive of recorded lectures.

* Please note that as of August 1, 2015, our webinar platform has changed. If you attended a webinar prior to that date, please review the new instructions.