Allan Loup of the University of Michigan Medical School to discuss the obligations of researchers at January webinar

bbag-iconAre Researchers Ever Obligated to Provide Individual Research Findings to Non-participant Third Parties?

Event flyer: Loup Flyer

A consensus is emerging that, in some circumstances, researchers have obligations to return individual research results to research participants. Recent methodological advances in genetics research suggest that researchers will increasingly uncover potentially pathogenic, actionable information relevant to individuals, such as family members of participants, who never involved themselves in research. Are investigators ever obligated to provide findings to these non-participant third parties? What could explain such obligations?

jan15Join us for Allan Loup’s lecture on Wednesday, January 15, 2014 from noon till 1 pm in person or online:

In person: The lecture will take place in C102 East Fee Hall on MSU’s East Lansing campus. Feel free to bring your lunch! Beverages and light snacks will be provided.

Online: Here are some instructions for your first time joining the webinar, or if you have attended or viewed them before, go to the meeting!

Allan Loup, JD, is a Regulatory Affairs Specialist at the University of Michigan Medical School. Loup graduated from the University of Michigan, received his law degree from Washington University in St. Louis, and trained in medical ethics at the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics at the University of Chicago. His current work addresses ethical and regulatory issues in the administration of research biorepositories.

NIH research grant awarded for project led by Tom Tomlinson and Raymond De Vries

tomlinsonTom Tomlinson, PhD, recently received a research grant from the National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH. Titled “Public Preferences for Addressing Donors’ Moral Concerns about Biobank Research,” the project is being led by Tomlinson and co-PI Raymond De Vries, PhD, of the University of Michigan.

To date, the dominant research ethics framework has focused on protecting research participants against the risks to their welfare that might be created by their participation in health research. This 3-year project is concerned with a different kind of “risk”—the risk that donated, de-identified biospecimens and health information might be used in research that is contrary to the donors’ moral, social or religious beliefs or values. How much do such concerns matter to people’s decisions whether to contribute specimens to research biobanks using a “blanket consent,” that gives one-time permission to use the contribution in any way the biobank deems acceptable? How should information about biobank-supported research projects be provided to potential donors? These and other questions will be answered using a nationally representative survey, coupled with a series of democratic deliberations that ask members of the public to develop recommendations for biobank policies regarding these issues. For more information, click here.

This project continues a line of research that Dr. Tomlinson began in 2010.

Deborah Fisch, JD, to address the current VBAC position at December’s Brownbag Webinar

bbag-iconThe Declining Provider:
Refusal, Responsibility, and Reasonableness

Event flyer: Fisch Flyer

Evidence shows that most women who give birth by cesarean section can successfully – and safely – give birth vaginally in future pregnancies. Yet in the United States, most such patients instead undergo repeat c-sections, in large part because of the dearth of institutions and practitioners that offer VBAC (vaginal birth after cesarean). Are providers justified in refusing to support VBAC? Is it reasonable for mothers to demand this option? Whose responsibility is it to ensure that an evidence-based option is available? Weaving together threads of medical science, public health, bioethics, consumer advocacy, medico-legal concerns, and reproductive justice, Fisch will examine how we arrived at our current VBAC position, its implications for maternal and child health, and the connection to other instances of declining providers.

Dec-4-for-blogJoin us for Deborah Fisch’s lecture on Wednesday, December 4, 2013 from noon till 1 pm in person or online:

In person: The lecture will take place in C102 East Fee Hall on MSU’s East Lansing campus. Feel free to bring your lunch! Beverages and light snacks will be provided.

Online: Here are some instructions for your first time joining the webinar, or if you have attended or viewed them before, go to the meeting!

Deborah Fisch, J.D., is affiliated with the University of Michigan Program for Sexual Rights and Reproductive Justice, the Human Rights in Childbirth Legal Defense Network, and Legal Advocates for Birth Options and Rights (LABOR). Her professional interests include the role of malpractice liability in determination of standard of care; the legal maternal-fetal relationship in pregnancy, labor and childbirth; regulation of out-of-hospital birth attendants and protocols for their interaction with in-hospital providers; and evolving access to maternity care under the ACA. She actively advocates for licensure of Certified Professional Midwives in Michigan. She earned her AB in Linguistics from the University of Michigan and her JD from Wayne State University Law School.

Linking Community Engagement Research to Public Health Biobank Practice

Ann Mongoven, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences was awarded a 5-year R01 grant in December 2010 from the National Institutes of Health. Her project, “Linking Community Engagement Research to Public Health Biobank Practice,” is part of a larger research project led by Sharon Kardia at the University of Michigan. The Michigan State University study will help drive public policy decisions and develop an improved consent process for the state’s bio-bank, known as the Michigan BioTrust. Jeff Proulx, a Health and Risk Communication graduate student, worked as a research assistant on the grant until his graduation in spring of 2012. Andrea Sexton, another Health and Risk Communication graduate student, joined the grant at that time to continue the research support. Read more about this study.